ZThemes

Saraswati's Daghter (ॐ)

Om ❂ Shreem ❂ Hreem ❂ Saraswati ❂ Namaha

Namastê! My name is Yara and I'm 18 year old Brazilia girl. I'm in love with all art manifestations: paintings, photographs and poetry.
I love History and it's curious facts; I love to discover about new cultures and religions. Feel free to talk to me and know me better. See ya!
like-tabigon:
Olá, boa noite! Eu estava procurando sobre uma frase que li, e acabei chegando ao seu tumblr, lol. É que... "The only way you can conquer me is through love and there I am gladly conquered". Eu gostaria muito de saber a fonte dessa frase. Foi Gopi Krishna que a disse? Ou está em algum livro? Eu realmente ficarei feliz se puder me ajudar. ;u; Desde já, agradeço!

Olá! Bom, eu acredito que foi Gopi Krishna que a disse sim, mas não sei se esta frase está no Bhagavad Gita ou em outro livro de cunho hinduísta. Eu só a procurei na internet mesmo. Desculpe pela falta de detalhes :(

posted Mar.07.14 + 0 notes + reblog

Characters of Spirited AwayKaonashi (No-Face, カオナシ)

historyofromanovs:

Romanov Birthdays → Catherine II of Russia, May 2


Originally a minor German princess destined to be only an consort of a Russian Emperor, no one knew Catherine would become Russia’s ruler in her own right. The period of Catherine the Great’s rule, the Catherinian Era, is often considered the Golden Age of the Russian Empire and the Russian nobility.
Catherine was born as Princess Sophie Friederike Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg on 2 May 1729. As Catherine grew up, her mother eventually came to see her daughter as a means to move up the social ladder and improve her own situation. Her mother had relatives in other royal courts in the region, and brought Catherine with her on visits to seek out possible suitors. Catherine saw marriage as a way to escape from her controlling mother.
Educated by tutors, Catherine had religious studies with a military chaplain, but she questioned much of what he taught her. She also learned three languages: German, French and Russian. The Russian came in handy when Catherine’s mother wrangled an invitation to Saint Petersburg from the Empress Elizabeth. She wanted to see if Catherine would be suitable for her heir, Grand Duke Peter (later Peter III).
On August 21, 1745, Catherine II married into the Russian imperial family, becoming a Grand Duchess. She and Peter proved to be anything but a happy couple, however. Peter was immature and juvenile, preferring to play with toys and mistresses than to be with his wife. Catherine II developed her own pastimes, which included reading extensively.
After several miscarriages, Catherine II finally produced a heir. Her son, Paul, was born on September 20, 1754. The paternity of the child has been a subject of great debate with many scholars, who believe that Paul’s father was actually Sergei Saltykov, a Russian noble and member of the court. Others have claimed that Paul looked a lot like Peter, leading them to believe that he was actually Paul’s father.
After succeeding the throne, Peter was openly cruel to his wife, and often discussed pushing her aside to allow his mistress to rule with him. He soon alienated other nobles, officials and the military with his staunch support for Prussia. He also angered the Orthodox Church by taking away their lands. After six months, Peter was overthrown in a coup orchestrated by Catherine.
At the time of Catherine’s accession, Russia was viewed as backward and provincial by many in Europe. She sought to change this negative opinion through expanding educational opportunities and the arts. She also became a prominent art collector, and many of these were displayed in the Hermitage in a royal residence in Saint Petersburg.
Catherine had enjoyed several decades as Russia’s absolute ruler. She had a strained relationship with her son and heir, Paul, over her tight grip on power, but she enjoyed her grandchildren, especially the oldest one: Alexander who later became Emperor Alexander I. In her later years, Catherine continued to possess an active mind and a strong spirit. On November 17, 1796, however, she was found unconscious on the floor of her bathroom. It was thought at the time that she suffered a stroke. She was buried along with other Romanovs at the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul. 

historyofromanovs:

Romanov Birthdays Catherine II of Russia, May 2

Originally a minor German princess destined to be only an consort of a Russian Emperor, no one knew Catherine would become Russia’s ruler in her own right. The period of Catherine the Great’s rule, the Catherinian Era, is often considered the Golden Age of the Russian Empire and the Russian nobility.

Catherine was born as Princess Sophie Friederike Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg on 2 May 1729. As Catherine grew up, her mother eventually came to see her daughter as a means to move up the social ladder and improve her own situation. Her mother had relatives in other royal courts in the region, and brought Catherine with her on visits to seek out possible suitors. Catherine saw marriage as a way to escape from her controlling mother.

Educated by tutors, Catherine had religious studies with a military chaplain, but she questioned much of what he taught her. She also learned three languages: German, French and Russian. The Russian came in handy when Catherine’s mother wrangled an invitation to Saint Petersburg from the Empress Elizabeth. She wanted to see if Catherine would be suitable for her heir, Grand Duke Peter (later Peter III).

On August 21, 1745, Catherine II married into the Russian imperial family, becoming a Grand Duchess. She and Peter proved to be anything but a happy couple, however. Peter was immature and juvenile, preferring to play with toys and mistresses than to be with his wife. Catherine II developed her own pastimes, which included reading extensively.

After several miscarriages, Catherine II finally produced a heir. Her son, Paul, was born on September 20, 1754. The paternity of the child has been a subject of great debate with many scholars, who believe that Paul’s father was actually Sergei Saltykov, a Russian noble and member of the court. Others have claimed that Paul looked a lot like Peter, leading them to believe that he was actually Paul’s father.

After succeeding the throne, Peter was openly cruel to his wife, and often discussed pushing her aside to allow his mistress to rule with him. He soon alienated other nobles, officials and the military with his staunch support for Prussia. He also angered the Orthodox Church by taking away their lands. After six months, Peter was overthrown in a coup orchestrated by Catherine.

At the time of Catherine’s accession, Russia was viewed as backward and provincial by many in Europe. She sought to change this negative opinion through expanding educational opportunities and the arts. She also became a prominent art collector, and many of these were displayed in the Hermitage in a royal residence in Saint Petersburg.

Catherine had enjoyed several decades as Russia’s absolute ruler. She had a strained relationship with her son and heir, Paul, over her tight grip on power, but she enjoyed her grandchildren, especially the oldest one: Alexander who later became Emperor Alexander I. In her later years, Catherine continued to possess an active mind and a strong spirit. On November 17, 1796, however, she was found unconscious on the floor of her bathroom. It was thought at the time that she suffered a stroke. She was buried along with other Romanovs at the Cathedral of St. Peter and St. Paul. 

asianhistory:


The picture above is a vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.
Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class. However, they did fight alongside of samurai warriors. They were wives, widows and daughters who answered the call of duty to protect their families, households and honor in times of war.
Onna Bugeisha were the exception, rather than the rule, but they still played an important role nonetheless. One famous example is empress Jingu, who reportedly lead a successful conquest against Korea in 200 AD without shedding a single drop of blood (or so the legends say).

This is the second time this photo has gone around, and it is still not an image of an Onna Bugeisha, but rather was a photograph from a set of photos of Kabuki actors and Geisha in costume. 
The original caption read:

Portraits of Japanese Kabuki actors and geisha. Unknown photographer, 1870s.

It went on auction, which you can see listed here, and there were 34 prints total, but none of them were of Onna Bugeisha. Just a heads up! There are images of Onna Bugeisha on this blog here. 

asianhistory:

The picture above is a vintage photograph of an onna-bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan.

Often mistakenly referred to as “female samurai”, female warriors have a long history in Japan, beginning long before samurai emerged as a warrior class. However, they did fight alongside of samurai warriors. They were wives, widows and daughters who answered the call of duty to protect their families, households and honor in times of war.

Onna Bugeisha were the exception, rather than the rule, but they still played an important role nonetheless. One famous example is empress Jingu, who reportedly lead a successful conquest against Korea in 200 AD without shedding a single drop of blood (or so the legends say).

This is the second time this photo has gone around, and it is still not an image of an Onna Bugeisha, but rather was a photograph from a set of photos of Kabuki actors and Geisha in costume. 

The original caption read:

Portraits of Japanese Kabuki actors and geisha. Unknown photographer, 1870s.

It went on auction, which you can see listed here, and there were 34 prints total, but none of them were of Onna Bugeisha. Just a heads up! There are images of Onna Bugeisha on this blog here

(Source: choosechoice)

soyouthinkyoucansee:

"Once, twice, three times a lady"

soyouthinkyoucansee:

"Once, twice, three times a lady"

omgthatdress:

Ensemble
1790s
The Kyoto Costume Institute

omgthatdress:

Ensemble

1790s

The Kyoto Costume Institute

omgthatdress:

Waistcoat
1790s
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

Waistcoat

1790s

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

soyouthinkyoucansee:

 Manon Balletti by Jean Marc Nattier,
1757 (Detail) H♥M

soyouthinkyoucansee:

 Manon Balletti by Jean Marc Nattier,

1757 (Detail) H♥M

a-l-ancien-regime:

Bridge/ Foyer to Hermitage Theater
The Arch on the Bridge over the Brook- a painting by Hubert Robert, 1798
The foyer is situated in the gallery constructed on the arches over the Winter Canal to the design of Yuri Velten in 1783 as a covered passage way linking the Great Hermitage and the Hermitage Theatre. The foyer decor was completed in 1902 to the design of Leonty Benois who managed to make it look unusual and refined at the same time. The gallery is decorated in the Rococo style known also as the style of the French king Louis XV. The splendid garlands of plants, scrolls and rocailles frame the inserts of paintings, cover the cove, decorate the wall panels, edge up the windows and doors. Through the large French windows supplying the gallery with bright light visitors may enjoy splendid views of the Neva River and the Winter Canal.

a-l-ancien-regime:

Bridge/ Foyer to Hermitage Theater

The Arch on the Bridge over the Brook- a painting by Hubert Robert, 1798

The foyer is situated in the gallery constructed on the arches over the Winter Canal to the design of Yuri Velten in 1783 as a covered passage way linking the Great Hermitage and the Hermitage Theatre. The foyer decor was completed in 1902 to the design of Leonty Benois who managed to make it look unusual and refined at the same time. The gallery is decorated in the Rococo style known also as the style of the French king Louis XV. The splendid garlands of plants, scrolls and rocailles frame the inserts of paintings, cover the cove, decorate the wall panels, edge up the windows and doors. Through the large French windows supplying the gallery with bright light visitors may enjoy splendid views of the Neva River and the Winter Canal.